FIPSE LSDL Modules

 

PLE 1: Module 5

Section 1: Building Trust to Enhance Racial Dialogue 

Powerful Learning Experience 1.1 Sharing Artifacts

Element Participant Instructions Instructor/Facilitator Notes

Purpose/Learning Objective

Begin process of trust building by sharing personal significant life experiences

We plan to begin class by getting to know each other. Please bring 3 or 5 artifacts that help to tell your story. You will have a small area to set up your artifacts and about 5 minutes to share with the group why you selected these items and what they say about you. Artifacts may include a variety of items, photographs, or mementos, etc. When selecting artifacts, think about:  What is unique about you? What has influenced you on your path to leadership? What do you want others to know about who you are?

If the class members or participants are meeting for the first time, we recommend you begin by sharing personal artifacts. Prior to the initial meeting date, communicate the need to bring artifacts to the session/class. (See participant instructions). We have also introduced this experience as being the curator for a museum exhibit on yourself. What are the important or significant or unique areas of your life you would want highlighted? What artifact(s) might best represent aspects of yourself?

Note:  Professor/Facilitator must participate. It may be a good idea for you to go first to model what to do.

Materials: Print or have participants create a name tent to label their exhibit of personal artifacts.

Process: 60 to 90 Minutes (will vary on size of group)
  1. Take your name tent and display/arrange your artifacts on a desk or table top
  2. Participate in a gallery walk to observe everyone’s artifact displays. What do you notice about the artifacts? What do you want to learn more about?
  3. Actively listen as each participant shares about 5 minutes about her/his artifacts.
  4. Contribute to group debrief discussion and/or individual journal exercise

Contribute to group debrief discussion

  1. Learning Environment: Arrange the room so that each person has a table or desk area to display artifacts with his/her name tent. (multiple displays can be on a single table).
  2. Remind students/participants that this is just the beginning of getting to know each other and that it is not necessary to reveal everything about yourself – just a brief glimpse of who you are as represented by these artifacts
  3. Encourage applause, thank each person for sharing
  4. Remind participants to actively listen as each person shares. (See Advocacy Module for Active Listening Process)
  5. The professor/facilitator models the process by going first
  6. Invite people to stand by or near each exhibit as the person presents
  7. Rely on participants to volunteer to go next rather than establish an order for the presentations
  8. Encourage applause, thank each person for sharing
  9. After everyone has finished, debrief to discuss: what was the purpose of this experience?

Video/Digital

n/a n/a
Guided Discussion

What was the purpose of this experience?
In what ways did this process support your knowledge of one another?
What connections did you make?

How might you adapt this process to building trust with teams or groups of staff members?

Facilitator Debrief: We suggest you debrief each learning experience included in this module and have participants articulate personal connections as well as possible future applications when working with school or district educational teams.

Readings n/a  
Supporting Materials n/a  
Related Websites n/a  
Reflective Journaling Optional: Participants may respond to guided discussion questions, or other prompts developed by facilitator in a journal entry.  
Assessments Level One n/a  

Extended Activity

Optional Follow On Experience: 15 minutes

Take a digital photo of each person’s display without his/her name tent.

A few days later, you can display the digital images in a PowerPoint or Keynote and have participants name each person’s display. We have often used this as the entry point in an 8 week summer course. A few days later, most people can name each person by first name. Challenge participants to also know each other’s last names.

 

Building a Community of Trust through Racial Awareness

Section 1: Building Trust to Enhance Racial Dialogue 

Powerful Learning Experience 1.2 Developing Shared Agreements

Element Participant Instructions Instructor/Facilitator Notes

Purpose

Create a positive learning environment through developing agreements that outline how the group will engage in discussions and build support for risk-taking.

Consider what you will need in order to create an environment that is safe for the personal risk taking required to deeply discuss race.

Think about a time when you felt safe enough to explore a difficult topic free of judgment.

For the purposes of our discussions, we will build on the Four Agreements of Courageous Conversations, (Singleton & Linton, 2006, p. 17)

  • Stay engaged
  • Speak your truth.
  • Experience discomfort.
  • Expect and accept non-closure

Students/participants are responsible for working together as leaders to develop what their agreements will be for the class. This set of agreements establishes the foundation for communication in the entire class and it helps deepen the conversation when they begin discussing topics about race. Agreements will include guidelines for allowing members of the class to speak their truth and to accept non-closure.  Students should be warned that these topics may cause anxiety and they should expect to experience discomfort. Accordingly, to ensure that learning takes place it will be essential to keep the conversation honest and respectful.

Materials:  Four Agreements of Courageous Conversations from Singleton & Linton, 2006, p. 17, chart paper, markers, journals (optional)

Learning Environment:  Learning Environment: Arrange the room so that students/participants can work as individuals and then move to partners/quads, etc

Think about a time when you felt safe enough to explore a difficult topic free of judgment.  Think about a time when you felt safe enough to explore a difficult topic free of judgment. Process
  1. Reflect on a time when you felt safe to explore a difficult topic – free of judgment. What elements or conditions were present that supported your ability to stay engaged? What might others need from you to feel safe and supported during challenging dialogue. Journal Option: Write a few notes in your journal.
  2. Listen as the facilitator outlines the 4 Agreements of Courageous Conversations
  3. Consider your needs for a supportive learning environment/
  4. Write 1-3 additional agreements you suggest be considered
  5. Join a partner and revisit/revise/combine to offer 1-3 additional agreements for consideration
  6. 2 Partner groups join for a quad to revisit/revise/combine to offer 1-3 additional agreements for consideration
  7. Join another quad for a group of 8 and repeat process recording suggested agreements on chart paper
  8. As a whole group, view the charts,
  9. Share and discuss any additional agreements and come to consensus on amending the original four agreements as needed. (see column at right)
10. Probe participants to consider what other agreements they might need to build an environment for explorations of race.NOTE: Coming to consensus is not the same as voting with majority rules. *Note: Coming to consensus is not the same as voting or moving forward by the consent of the majority.
Video    
Guided Discussion
  1. Reflect on the agreements
  2. Describe what following and not following the agreements might look like, sound like, feel like.
  3. Do you feel you can commit to following these agreements?
  4. If not, why not? What would need to change in order for you to make this commitment?
Guide the group toward coming to consensus. Allow the space for discussion to be sure each participant is clear about a shared understanding of what each agreement means. Encourage participants to listen to and carefully consider any dissenting views.
Readings

Four Agreements of Courageous Conversations from Singleton & Linton, 2006, p. 17

 
Supporting Materials    
Related Websites    
Reflective Journaling    
Assessments Level One    
Extended Activity