Initiatives

 

Center for the International Study of School Leadership

 

The UCEA Center for the International Study of School Leadership gathers national and international communities of scholars, practitioners, policy makers and government agencies dedicated to the improvement of schools through school leadership. The Center is dedicated to fostering a cross-national effort in the improvement of leaders and their leadership, who in turn can be well informed about research at a global level—thus positively and pro-actively affecting students, teachers, and families. The new center purposely expands its scope to support broader UCEA visibility, respectability, and participation of national and international scholars and practitioners.

Directors

Jami Berry
Georgia State University, USA
Email: jberry2@gsu.edu

Melanie Brooks
Monash University, Australia
Email: melanie.brooks@monash.edu

Ross Notman
University of Otaga, New Zealand
Email: ross.notman@otago.ac.nz

 

Click on the tabs below to learn more about the center activities:

Vision

The UCEA Center for the International Study of School Leadership gathers national and international communities of scholars, practitioners, policy makers and government agencies dedicated to the improvement of schools through school leadership. The Center is dedicated to fostering a cross-national effort in the improvement of leaders and their leadership, who in turn can be well informed about research at a global level—thus positively and pro-actively affecting students, teachers, and families. The new center purposely expands its scope to support broader UCEA visibility, respectability, and participation of national and international scholars and practitioners.

Mission

The mission of the UCEA Center for the International Study of School Leadership is to generate and mobilize evidence-based research knowledge of school leadership through a pro-active approach, combining national and international efforts to improve schooling for the success of children. The quality preparation and professional development of school leaders, combined with collaborative partnerships with researchers, policy-makers, and governmental agencies are aimed to advance an understanding of common leadership challenges and successes in multiple countries.

Goals

The goals for the center are to:

(a) Foster collaborative forms of research about school leadership

(b) Synthesize leadership preparation, research, and practice and disseminate this information

(c) Facilitate knowledge brokering through partnerships between UCEA and other national and international professional associations, actively networking with researchers, practitioners, and policy makers.

 

The UCEA Center for the International Study of School Leadership generates an important forum which allows for cutting-edge conversations about the essential problems of school leadership practice, and in housing and disseminating ongoing collaborative research more intently. Furthermore, accessible research combining national and international efforts will not only enhance the preparation and professional development of educational leaders and professors, but positively enrich local, state, and national policy. Please do not hesitate to contact any of us for more information.

 

Efforts for Knowledge Mobilization

The goals for the center are to:

(a) Foster collaborative forms of research about school leadership

(b) Synthesize leadership preparation, research, and practice and disseminate this information

(c) Facilitate knowledge brokering through partnerships between UCEA and other national and international professional associations, actively networking with researchers, practitioners, and policy makers.

In order to develop these goals, a timeline for the development of the center has been developed:

GOALS

Phase I

Phase II

Phase III

A) Foster collaborative forms of research about school leadership

Invite individual researchers, professional associations, and preparation organizations/institutions to join the center

Invite individuals and groups to present at UCEA center sponsored conference sessions

Provide a networking session as part of the UCEA annual meeting

Collaborate with other individuals and organizations on research proposals and grants

B) Synthesize leadership preparation, research, and practice/ dissemination of information

Conduct forums to develop the dissemination of   research briefs

Create a collective knowledge mobilization plan with Board members

Implementation of the knowledge mobilization plan

C) Facilitate knowledge brokering through partnerships between UCEA and other national and international professional associations, actively networking with researchers, practitioners, and policy makers.

Conduct collaborative partnerships forums

Hold sessions and workshops on policy briefs

Generate networking opportunities during UCEA annual meeting

Collect policy briefs from members

Dissemination of research briefs

Organize these briefs and begin pushing this out to policy-makers through a knowledge mobilization plan

 

International News and Conferences

  1. The British Educational Leadership, Management & Administration Society (BEMAS) Conference 2016
  2. The Education Leadership Symposium
  3. CSLEE’s 21st Annual Values and Leadership Conference 2016
  4. Jobs/open positions at the IBB (e.g. the International Research Fellowship),
  5. Education Leadership Symposium (e.g. save-the-date for 2017),
  6. New publications (e.g. call for proposals for EAEA).
  7. Symposium about the World School Leadership Study (WSLS) at the World Education Research Association (WERA) focal meeting 2016 at AERA annual meeting 2016,
  8. American Educational Research Association (AERA) Annual Meeting 2016: Presentations of the IBB,
  9. British Educational Leadership, Management & Administration Society (BEMAS) Conference 2016
  10. CAS Educational Governance.

 

 

New Publications from Professors Huber and Skedsmo

Educational Assessment, Evaluation and Accountability (EAEA) As new Editors-in-Chief (per 2016), Stephan Gerhard Huber und Guri Skedsmo invite you to submit articles to this international journal. It is indexed in SSCI and others.

More details can be found at: www.EduLead.net/EAEA

The International Handbook of Evaluation and Assessment in Education (IH-EAE)

The main objective of the handbook is to provide a comprehensive up-to-date compilation of important issues of evaluation and assessment in education through rigorously reviewed top-quality contributions from key researchers and practitioners from around the world.

Call for and selection of proposals is planned for spring/summer 2016.

If you are interested, please send an email to the Editor-in-Chief: IH-EAE@EduLead.net

If you are interested in information on further publications in German e.g.

– in the journal SVS (as special issues) on themes such as: refugees, participation in schools, quality management/evaluation, HRM,  and

– the new Yearbook SchooLeadership 2016

Please look at the German infoemail: www.Bildungsmanagement.net/pdf/info-email-maerz-2016.pdf

Furthermore, you will find some references and links for download at the end of this email. 

 

Advisory Board

  • In order to extend the influence, outreach, and work of the UCEA Center for the International Study of School Leadership, a Center Advisory Board has been established. The following purposes, organization and structure, and general responsibilities of Advisory Board members are presented:

    Purpose         

    1. To assist the Center co-directors to attract the human (e.g., expertise, skill, knowledge) and financial resources necessary to continuing the Center’s continuing growth, health, effectiveness, and connection to practice.
    2. To assist in the articulation, dissemination, and achievement of Center goals and objectives.
    3. To assist the co-directors in special projects
    4. To augment expertise in various areas of Center interest
    5. To counsel with the co-directors regarding the goals, objectives, and activities of the Center.
    6. To serve the Center as an integral constituent group and, together, with Center co-directors and UCEA Executive staff, provide for the continuation, visibility, respectability, and participation of national and international scholars and practitioners.

    Organization and Structure

    1. Members shall serve for terms of staggered three years and shall be eligible for term renewal. Members may, from time to time, serve in terms less than three years. During the initial year, members will be appointed by Center co-directors and, thereafter, by the established membership of the Center Advisory Board.
    2. Advisory Board members will be invited to Center business meetings at the UCEA Convention and special meetings called by Center co-directors.
    3. No formal standing committees comprised of Advisory Board members shall be established although ad hoc committees and working groups shall be formed as the need arises.

    General Responsibilities

    1. Attend the Center business meeting at the annual UCEA Convention.
    2. Participate, from time to time, in special projects involving various segments of the work of the Center. In addition to self-initiated work, projects may be invited by Center co-directors.
    3. Serve as hosts in individual geographic areas for the purpose of recruitment for Center participation, collaboration, connection to practice, and financial resource development
    4. Officially represent the Center at various professional functions and activities such as conferences.
    5. Be alert for opportunities to connect to practice and develop collaborative partnerships with researchers, policy-makers, and governmental agencies are aimed to advance an understanding of common leadership challenges and successes in multiple countries as well as attracting financial support.
    6. Utilize personal influence, prestige, and energies to advance the UCEA Center for the International Study of School Leadership in association with Center national and international co-directors.
    7. Act as ambassadors for the Center, telling the accomplishments of the Center and extending a positive image.
    8. Acquire a thorough knowledge of Center aims and goals.

     

    2014-2016 Advisory Board Members

    Helene Ärlestig, helene.arlestig@umu.se

    Director of studies at the Centre for Principal Development, Umea University

    Bruce Barnett,bruce.barnett@utsa.edu

    Professor and Chair, University of Texas at San Antonio, bruce.barnett@utsa.edu

    Jami Berry, jberry2@gsu.edu

    Educational Leadership Program Coordinator, Georgia State University

    Ira Bogotch, ibogotch@fau.edu

    Professor and Chair of the COE International Committee, Florida Atlantic University

    Stefan Brauckmann, Stefan.Brauckmann@aau.at

    Professor and Chair, Institute of instructional and school development, Alpen-Adria Universitat

    Ken Brien, kbrien1@unb.ca

    Associate Professor of Education, Educational administration and leadership, University of New Brunswick

    Lawrie Drysdale, drysdale@unimelb.edu.au

    Professor, Melbourne Graduate School of Education

    Helene Goode, hmgoode@unimelb.edu.au

    Lecturer, Melbourne Graduate School of Education

    Margaret Grogan, Margaret.grogan@cgu.edu

    Professor of Education, School of Educational Studies, Claremont Graduate University.

    David Gurr, d.gurr@unimelb.edu.au

    Professor, Melbourne Graduate School of Education

    Jan Heystek, jan.heystek@nwu.ac.za

    Professor of Education Science, North-West University

    Stephan Huber, Stephan.Huber@phzg.ch

    Head of the Institute for Management and Economics of Education, University of Teacher Education of Zug, Switzerland

    Olof Johansson, olof.johansson@pol.umu.se

    Professor, Deputy Head of Centre for Principal Development

    Betty Merchant, betty.merchant@utsa.edu

    Professor and Dean, College of Education, University of Texas at San Antonio

    Petros Pashiardis, p.pashiardis@ouc.ac.cy

    Director of the Center for Research and Training in Educational Leadership and Policy, Open University of Cyprus

    Guri Skedsmo, guri.skedsmo@ils.uio.no

    Institute for the Management and Economics of Education, University of Teacher Education of Zug, Switzerland

    Charlie Slater, Charles.slater@csulb.edu

    Professor of Educational Leadership, California State University Long Beach

    Howard Stevenson, Howard.Stevenson@nottingham.ac.uk

    Director of Research and Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, University of Nottingham

    Michael Uljens, Michael.uljens@abo.fi

    Professor of General Pedagogy and Educational Leadership, Åbo Akademi University

     

    Research

    The international community of researchers is active in developing research related to international issues. In this section we include research shared by members of UCEA and the larger international community of scholars. As a knowledge mobilization initiative, it is the Center’s intent to facilitate the exchange of research with practitioners, researchers, and students. Please feel free to share up to five publications with related keywords at uceainternational@gmail.com.

    Denise Armstrong

    Novak, J., Armstrong, D., & Browne, B. (2014). Leading and mentoring for educational lives: Inviting imaginative acts of hope in a connected world. Rotterdam, Netherlands: Sense Publishers.

    Keywords – invitational leadership, equity, inclusion

    Armstrong, D., Tuters, S., & Carrier, N. (2014) Micropolitics and social justice leadership: Bridging beliefs and behaviours,  Journal of Educational Administration and Foundations, 23(2), 35-53.

    Keywords – micropolitics, leadership, social justice

    Armstrong, D., & McMahon, B. (2014).  Developing socially just leaders: Integrative  antiracist approaches in a transformational paradigm.  In A. Normore& N. Erbe (Eds.). Collective Efficacy: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Leadership (pp. 23-39). London: Emerald.

    Keywords – leadership, leadership development, social justice

    Armstrong, D. (2012). Connecting personal change and organizational passage in the transition from teacher to vice principal, Journal of School Leadership, 22(3), 398-424.

    Keywords – vice-principals, leadership, transitions

    Armstrong, D. (2009). Administrative passages: Navigating the transition from teacher to assistant principal. Studies in Educational Leadership, Vol. 4. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

    Keywords – vice-principals, leadership development, transitions

    Jeffrey Bennett

    Drysdale, L., Bennett, J., Murakami, E., Johansson, O., & Gurr, D. (in press). Heroic leadership in Australia, Sweden, and the United States. International Journal of Educational Management.

    Keywords: Heroic leadership, distributed leadership, collaboration, capacity-building

    Ylimaki, R., Brunderman, L., Dugan, T., & Bennett, J. (2014). Developing Arizona turnaround leaders to build high-capacity schools in the midst of accountability pressures and changing demographics. Leadership and Policy in Schools, 13, 28-60.

    Keywords: School turnaround, capacity-building leadership, culturally relevant leadership

    Bennett, J., Ylimaki, R., Dugan, T., & Brunderman, L (2013, July). Developing the potential for sustainable improvement in underperforming schools: Capacity building in the socio-cultural dimension. Journal of Educational Change. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10833-013-9217-6.

    Keywords: School turnaround, capacity-building leadership, culturally relevant leadership

    Bennett, J.V. (2012). “Democratic” collaboration for school turnaround in Southern Arizona. International Journal of Educational Management, 26(5), 442-451.

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09513541211240237.

    Keywords: School turnaround, distributed leadership, collaboration, ethic of community

    Ylimaki, R., Bennett, J., Fan, J., & Villaseñor, E. (2012). Notions of “success” in Southern Arizona schools: Principal leadership in changing demographic and border contexts. Leadership & Policy in Schools, 11(2), 168-193. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15700763.2011.585539.

    Keywords: School turnaround, principal leadership, culturally responsive leadership, instructional leadership, funds of knowledge, ethic of community

    Ira Bogotch

    Bogotch, I. & Reyes-Guerra, D. (December, 2014). Initiating social justice pedagogies. Guest

    editors for Special Issue on Leadership for Social Justice, F. Javier Murillo and Reyes Hernández-Castilla, Revista international de educacion para la justicia social. Volume 3(2), http://www.rinace.net/riejs/proximos_numeros_english.html

    Reyes-Guerra, D., Russo, M., Bogotch, I., & Vasquez, M. (December, 2014). Building a school

    leaders program: An American paradox of autonomy and accountability. UK Journal of School Leadership and Management, Special Issue: Guest Editor: Ira Bogotch

    Townsend, T., MacBeath, J., & Bogotch, I. (in press). Critical and alternative Perspectives on

                EER (Chapter 18). In C. Chapman, D. Muijs, D. Reynolds, P. Sammons,& C.

                Teddlie (Eds.). International Handbook on Educational Effectiveness Research. London:

                Routledge

    Bogotch, I. & Shields, C. (2014). Introduction: Promises of social justice trump paradigms of

                educational leadership. In I. Bogotch & C. Shields, C. (Eds.). International Handbook of

                Educational Leadership and Social (In)Justice. Chapter 1. Dordrecht, NL: Springer

    Bogotch, I. & Maslin-Ostrowski (2010). Internationalizing educational leadership:  How a

                university department jumps the curve from local to international. Educational

                Administration Quarterly, 46(2), 210-240.

    Gary Crow

    Crow, G.M., Scribner, M.P.S. (2014). Professional identities of urban school leaders. In H.R.

    Milner & K. Lomotey (Eds.), Handbook of Urban Education (pp. 287-304). London: Routledge Press.

    Matthews, L.Jl, & Crow, G. M. (2010). The principalship: New roles for a professional learning

                community. New York: Pearson: Allyn & Bacon.

    Young, M.D., Crow, G.M., Murphy, J., & Ogawa, R. (2009). Handbook of research on the

                education of school leaders. New York: Routledge.

    Lumby, J., Crow, G., & Pashiardis, P. (Eds.) (2008). International handbook on the preparation

                and development of school leaders. New York: Routledge.

    Crow, G.M. (2007). The complex landscape of successful principal practices: An international

                perspective. International Studies in Educational Administration, 35(3), 67-74.

    Keywords: Principalship, leadership, leadership development, school reform.

    Jan Heystack

    Heystek, J. & Terhoven, R. (2014). Motivation as critical factor for teacher development in

    contextually challenging underperforming schools in South Africa. Journal of Professional Development

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19415257.2014.940628.

    Heystek, J. (2014). Principals’ perceptions about performance agreements as motivational

    action. Educational Management Administration & Leadership, Educational Management, 42(6), 889-902

    Heystek, J. & Minnar, L. (2013). Online surveys as data collection instruments in education

                research: A Feasible Option? South African Journal of Higher Education, 27(1), 162-183

    Heystek J. & Lumby J. (2011). Identity and diversity: A case study of leaders in a South African

                primary school. Education as Change, 15(2), 331-343

    Heystek J. (2011). School governing bodies in South African schools: Under pressure to enhance

    democratization and improve quality. Educational Management Administration & Leadership, 39(4), 455-468

    Steve Jacobson

    Ylimaki, R., & S. Jacobson. Editors (2011). U.S. and cross-national policies, practices, and

                preparation: Implications for successful instructional leadership, organizational learning, and

                culturally responsive practices. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer-Kluwer.

    Key Words: Successful School Leadership, Instructional Leadership, Organizational Learning, Culturally Responsive Practices, Educational Leadership Preparation

    Minor-Ragan, Y. & Jacobson, S. (2014). In her own words: Turning around an under-performing school. In Leading schools successfully: Stories from the field. (pp. 9-18). C. Day & D. Gurr (Eds.) London: Routledge.

    Key Words: Successful School Leadership, Instructional Leadership, Organizational Learning, Turnaround Schools

    Jacobson, S. & Szczesek, J. (2013). School improvement and urban renewal: The impact of a turn-

                around school’s performance on real property values in its surrounding community. Leadership

                and Policy in Schools, 12(1), 1-11.

    Key Words: School Improvement, Urban Renewal, Turn-around Schools

    Jacobson, S. & Cypres, A. (2012). Important shifts in curriculum of educational leadership preparation. Journal of Research on Leadership Education, 7(2), 217-236.

    Key Words: Educational Leadership Preparation, Instructional Leadership, Organizational Learning

    Jacobson, S. (2011). School leadership and its effects on student achievement. International Journal of

                Educational Management, 25(1), 33-44.

    Key Words: School Leadership, Instructional Leadership, Student Achievement

    Hans Klar

    Klar, H. W. & Brewer, C. A. (2014). Successful leadership in a rural, high-poverty school: The case of County Line Middle School. Journal of Educational Administration, 52(4), 422-445. doi: 10.1108/JEA-04-2013-0056

    Klar, H. W., & Brewer, C. A., (2013). Successful leadership in high-needs schools: An examination of core leadership practices enacted in challenging contexts. Educational Administration Quarterly. 1-41. doi:10.1177/0013161X13482577

    Key words: Principal, leadership, middle school, school improvement, context, rural schools

    Elizabeth Murakami

    Murakami, E., Tornsen, M., & Pollock, K. (2014). School principals’ standards and expectations in three educational contexts. Canadian and International Education Journal 43(1), Article 6. Available at: http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/cie-eci/vol43/iss1/6.

    Key words: Principals, Educational Leadership Preparation, Policy, Work Expectations

    Murakami, E., & Orr, M. (2012). International successful school principal project: Cases of improvement and sustainability in North American schools. Journal of Cases in Educational Leadership 15(3), 3-6. DOI: 10.1177/1555458912447795.

    Key words: Successful School Leadership, Instructional Leadership, Leadership Learning

    Murakami-Ramalho, E., Arlestig, H., & Tornsen, M. (2011). Successful principal leadership in Sweden and the United States: Importing and exporting educational leaders’ knowledge of high-stakes testing. International Studies in Educational Administration, 39(2), 97-112.

    Key words: Educational Leadership Preparation, Preparation Standards, Educational Policy, Work Expectations

    Murakami-Ramalho, E. & Benham, M. (2010). Around the fish net: Leadership dynamics for change in an American international school. Educational Management, Administration, and Leadership (EMAL) Journal, 38(5), 625-643. DOI: 10.1177/1741143210373736.

    Key words: Organizational Learning, School Improvement, Politics in Education

    Murakami-Ramalho, E. (2008). Domestic practices in foreign lands: Lessons on leadership for diversity in American international schools. Journal of Studies in International Education, 12(1), 76-95. DOI: 10.1177/1028315306291668.

    Key words: School Governance, Organizational Learning, Culturally Responsive Practices, School Improvement

    Murakami-Ramalho, E. (2008). On what side of “International” are we? Using cognitive frames to explore educational leaders. International Journal of Urban Educational Leadership, 2(1), 16-29.

    Key words: International Education, Globalization of Knowledge, Educational Leaders, Organizational Learning

    Petros Pashiardis

    Pashiardis, P. (2014) (Ed.). Modeling School Leadership Across Europe: In Search of New Frontiers. Dordrecht, Heidelberg, New York, London: Springer.

    Keywords: LISA study – accountability – educational system – effective school leadership – effects of school leadership on student achievement – instructional style – pro-LEAD study – professional development opportunities – school climate variables development – school improvement – school leaders – system-level differences – systemic leadership – teaching and learning practices

    Beycioglu, K. & Pashiardis, P. (2015). Multidimensional perspectives on principal leadership effectiveness. (Editors). Hershey, Pennsylvania (USA): IGI Global.

    Keywords: Administrative Foundations; Distributed Leadership; Managing Change; Principal Evaluation; Student Achievement; Time Management

    Pashiardis, P. & Brauckmann, S. (2011). School leadership and its effects on student achievement. (Editors). Special Issue, International Journal of Educational Management, 25(1). London: Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

    Keywords: Leadership Styles of a Holistic Leadership Theoretical Framework; Leadership Effects on Student Achievement and Sustained School Success; Leadership and organisational performance; Impact of School Leadership on Pupil Outcomes

    Pashiardis, P. & Brauckmann, S. (2008). Evaluation of school principals. In G. Crow, J. Lumby, & P. Pashiardis (Eds.) International handbook on the preparation and development of school leaders (pp. 263-279). New York: Routledge.

    Keywords: Critical review of principal evaluation, practices evaluated

    Brauckmann, S. & Pashiardis, P. (2011). A validation study of the leadership styles of a holistic leadership theoretical framework. International Journal of Educational Management, 25(1), 11-32.

    Keywords: holistic theoretical framework, leadership styles, context, principals, lower secondary schools, international comparative approach, student achievement.

    Charlie Slater

    Slater, C.L., Potter, I., Torres, N., & Briceno, F. (2014). Understanding Social Justice Leadership: An International Exploration of the Perspectives of Two School Leaders in Costa Rica and England. Management in Education, 28(30), 110-115.

    Slater, C.L. & Nelson, S. (eds.) (2013). Understanding the Principalship: An International Guide to Principal Preparation. Emerald Group Publishing Limited, England.

    Shin, S., Slater, C.L., & Backhoff, E. (2013). Principal Perceptions and Student Achievement in Reading in Korea, Mexico, and the United States: Educational Leadership, School Autonomy, and Use of Test Results. Educational Administration Quarterly, 49(3), 489-527.

    Slater, C.L. (2011). Understanding Principal Leadership: An International Perspective and a Narrative Approach. Educational Management Administration & Leadership, 39(2), 219-227.

    Slater, C.L. Garcia, J.M., & Gorosave, G. (2008). Challenges of a Successful First-Year Principal in Mexico. Journal of Educational Administration, 46(6), 702-714.

    Slater, C.L., Boone, M., Price, L., Martinez, D. Alvarez, I., Topete, C. & Olea, E. (2002). A cross-cultural investigation of leadership in the United States and Mexico. School Leadership and Management, 22, 197-209.

     

    International Activities at UCEA

    Research shared by International scholars presenting on local and International issues at UCEA in 2014 allowed for the mobilization of knowledge. Here is a review of this rich and contemporary exchange:

    Connecting Local and International Research to Practice

    Katina Pollock, University of Western Ontario, Carol Campbell, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (University of Toronto). Chairs: Elizabeth T. Murakami, Texas A&M University San Antonio Monika Törnsén, Center for Principal Development, Umeå University Jeffrey V. Bennett, University of Arizona

    The purpose of this mini-workshop is to provide local and international participants with knowledge and skills to communicate and connect research to practice through knowledge mobilization practices. This interactive workshop, organized by the newly re-established UCEA Center for the International Study of School Leadership, aims to increase the dissemination of knowledge of school leadership at a global level. Participants will develop their own knowledge mobilization plan for their specific research.

    A Comparative Analysis of Educational Policies and Social Justice Outcomes in the U.S. and New Zealand

    Linda R. Vogel, University of Northern Colorado; Brian Annan, University of Aukland

    The U.S. and New Zealand have embraced standards-based education since the early 1990s to promote social justice, as well as economic prosperity. While the purposes of implementing standards-based educational policies in the two countries have been remarkably similar, the resulting policies are remarkably dissimilar. This paper is a descriptive comparison of the education policies and associated political contexts of the U.S. and New Zealand related to the adoption and implementation of standards-based education.

    Building and Leading Learning Cultures: A Case Study of a Shanghai Primary School

    Haiyan Qian, Hong Kong Institute of Education; Allan Walker, Hong Kong Institute of Education; Xiaowei Yang, East China Normal University

    Using the data collected from the principal, vice principal, mid-level leaders, and teachers of a primary school in Shanghai, the paper attempts to illustrate what school leaders can do to build and sustain learning cultures and how the learning culture impacts teachers’ sense of belonging to the school and their dedication to ongoing learning.

    What do we Already Know, What is Necessary to Have More Research About, and What Importance has Research on Principals?

    Paul V. Bredeson, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Olof Johansson, Umeå University, R.C. Saravanabhavan, Howard University, Katina Pollock, University of Western Ontario, Izhar Oplatka, Tel Aviv University, Keshni Bipath, University of Pretoria, David Gurr, University of Melbourne, Lawrie Drysdale, University of Melbourne, Muna Karim, Howard University, Deena Khalil, Howard University Helene Arlestig, University of Umeå, Chair: Stephen L. Jacobson, University at Buffalo.

    In this symposium the above and other questions based on thematic analyses of research on principals in eight national contexts were discussed. The represented countries are Sweden, United States, Canada, Australia, Israel, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, and India.

    Conceptualizing the Professional Learning Community Process through a Global Perspective: Focusing on Leadership in Three Countries

    Dianne F. Olivier, University of Louisiana at Lafayette; Jane B. Huffman, University of North Texas; Ting Wang, University of Canberra; (Australia) Peiying Chen, National Taiwan Normal University

    This paper addresses multiple issues: a PLC global conceptual framework; findings of leadership practices in the U.S., China, and Taiwan; implications of global issues of educational leadership in relation to policy/practice; and global research to enrich overall understanding of the PLC process. This research stems from investigation by a Global PLC Network (GloPLCNet), a community of international researchers focused on conducting international comparative studies of PLCs and school leadership in a globalized context.

    Toward a Common General Framework Bridging Educational Leadership and Curriculum Theory: Examples from Finland and U.S.

    Michael Uljens, Abo University (Sweden); Rose Ylimaki, University of Arizona

    This paper examines how leadership, curriculum and evaluation are merging within neoliberal educational and accountability policies, using Finland and the U.S. as examples. We use curriculum theory and educational leadership research to examine dominating theoretical frameworks in leadership research and curriculum, existing research approaches to curriculum and leadership, and different research traditions within their cultural-historical and political contexts. These examinations inform elements for a common general framework uniting educational leadership and curriculum theory.

    An International Partnership in Higher Education: Enhancing Students’ Understanding of Educational Leadership for Social Justice.

    Paul Richard Haxton, University of Central Oklahoma; Jenny Ferrier-Kerr, University of Waikato (New Zealand). Chair: Bruce Barnett, University of Texas at San Antonio

    The aim of faculty and students from two universities halfway around the world from each other was to establish a collaboration in educational leadership, to explore interesting and diverse avenues for collaboration. A partnership between the University of Central Oklahoma (USA) and the University of Waikato (New Zealand) has contributed to students’ and faculty’s understanding of, and preparation for leadership promoting social justice.

    Leadership and Democratic Citizenship Learning: An Empirical Investigation of a Complex Relationship

    Vassos Savvides, Open University of Cyprus; Petros Pashiardis, Open University of Cyprus. Chair: Patrice C. Wilson, Virginia Commonwealth University

    The current study investigated direct and indirect relationships between leadership and student citizenship outcomes in Cyprus middle schools. Several contextual student variables and one classroom variable were found to have a direct effect on civic outcomes. School leadership was found to have a positive association with School Academic Optimism. Overall, the findings indicated that there is a missing link between school level variables and civic-related variables at the classroom and student level.

    Professional Identity of Female Principals in Two Educational Settings: Sweden and Texas, USA.

    Monika Törnsén, Center for Principal Development, Umeå University (Sweden); Elizabeth T. Murakami, Texas A&M University-San Antonio

    This study examines the development of principals’ professional identities within their workplace. Using the examples of two female leaders, the research expands on previous studies of school principals’ professional identity. Using a narrative inquiry approach, we analyze how family and upbringing, life experiences, and multiple tasks and challenges within the work in public high schools impact two successful principals, one in Sweden and one in Texas, USA.

    Ethnicity, Embodiment, and Educational Leadership: Multicultural Perspectives in Aotearoa-NZ and the US.

    Lorri Michelle Johnson Santamaria, University of Auckland, New Zealand; Melinda Webber, University of Auckland

    This paper considers the leadership practices of 60 Maori principals and school leaders as exemplars

    of ethnicity, embodiment and educational leadership for Indigenous, multicultural, multilingual learners. We present ways to lead that positively impact Indigenous learner outcomes in school settings in NZ as explored and presented alongside the experiences of leaders of colour in the US who also embody ethnicity in their practice to positively impact culturally and linguistically diverse learner outcomes in the US.

    Performing Governance: Managing the Performance of Principals in England

    David Eddy-Spicer, University of Virginia; Megan Crawford, BELMAS Council; Peter Earley, Institute of Education, University of London; Chris James, University of Bath (UK); Sara Bubb, Institute of Education, University of London; Jeff Jones, Independent Researcher; Rebecca Nelson, Institute of Education, University of London; Elizabeth Wood, Institute of Education, University of London

    This paper reports on a national study of the role of school governing bodies in the management of principal performance in England. Robust, local oversight of school leader performance is crucial in the English system, in which school autonomy is central. The paper offers insight into the ways in which the microprocesses of governing shape governance within a system reliant on multiple and, at times, conflicting approaches to accountability.

    Principals’ Work and Workload in the Contemporary Era: A View from Ontario

    Katina Pollock, University of Western Ontario; Michael Mindzak, Western University; D. Cameron Hauseman, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto; Patricia Briscoe, Western University. Chair: Maria de Lourdes Viloria, Texas A&M International University

    In this paper, we explore the changing nature of school principals’ work. Drawing from qualitative interviews and survey data with school principals from Ontario, Canada, we examine the role of the school principal in the contemporary period. Our findings indicate that principals face considerable challenges with growing workloads and work intensification. Such challenges and implications are further discussed.

    Building Hope through a School in Ciudad Juarez: A Qualitative Case Study

    David DeMatthews, University of Texas at El Paso; D. Brent Edwards, University of Tokyo

    This paper presents a qualitative case study of one private nondenominational Christian school located in a squatter’s neighborhood in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

    Exploring the Characteristics of Systems School Leadership

    Chen Schechter, Bar-Ilan University; Haim Shaked, Bar-Ilan University (Israel)

    This study explored the characteristics of school leadership where principals lead schools through the systems-thinking concept and procedures. This study used qualitative methodology, focusing on (a) prospective principals in a principal-preparation program, (b) novice principals in their 1st year on the job, and (3) outstanding principals. Data analysis yielded four main characteristics of systems-school leadership: (a) leading wholes, (b) adopting a multidimensional view, (c) influencing indirectly, and (d) evaluating significance.

    Handbook of Ethical Educational Leadership: Drawing Together Theory, Research, and Supporting Literature Inspired by the CSLE

    Haiyan Qian, Hong Kong Institute of Education; Allan Walker, Hong Kong Institute of Education; William C. Frick, University of Oklahoma; John Covaleskie,University of Oklahoma; Anthony H. Normore, California State University; Dominguez Hill; Pauline Leonard, Louisiana Tech University; Paul Begley, Nipissing University

    The Center for the Study of Leadership and Ethics has recently published a comprehensive resource for the filed with its new title Handbook of Ethical Educational Leadership, published by Routledge and edited by Christopher M. Branson and Steven Jay Gross. The symposium brings together authors of selected chapters within the volume to showcase the range and depth of topics and issues for the profession.

    Leadership for Social Justice: Metaphors of and for Action

    Denise Armstrong, Brock University; Stephanie Tuters, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

    This paper focuses the metaphors that 38 school leaders used to describe their micropolitical challenges. The findings revealed that these metaphors often coalesced around military, game and movement metaphors. We discuss the nature and implication of these metaphors and make recommendations to policy makers, practitioners, and preparation programs regarding using metaphors to assist educational leaders in reflecting on and developing sustainable strategies that ensure social justice for all.

    The Impact Speed of Delivery and Vision on the Perceived Charisma of a School’s Principal

    Ronit Bogler, The Open University of Israel; Avner Caspi, The Open University of Israel; Ofir Tzuman, The Open University of Israel. Chair: Stacey A. Rutledge, Florida State University

    Leaders’ delivery and vision are two central facets of charisma that appear frequently in the literature. We aimed at examining the relative impact speed of school principal’s delivery and vision on one’s perceptions of the principal’s charisma. Kahneman’s (2011) two modes of thought (System 1 and System 2) served as a theoretical framework, predicting that delivery will impact perceived charisma faster than vision. A quantitative study, using moment-by-moment track of charisma perception, confirmed this prediction.

    Advancement of Race and Ethnicity Research Workshop: Exploring Theoretical and Conceptual Frameworks in Educational Leadership

    Lorri Michelle Johnson Santamaria, The University of Auckland, New Zealand; Brenda Lloyd-Jones, University of Oklahoma Hollie J. Mackey, University of Oklahoma Natalie A. Tran, California State University, Fullerton Dr. Cosette M. Grant-Overton, University of Cincinnati. Chairs: Gaetane Jean-Marie, University of Louisville, Elizabeth T. Murakami, Texas A&M University-San Antonio.

    This mini-workshop grounded on the principles of andragogy, will promote a lively interaction among attendees to review, dialogue, and generate new theoretical and conceptual research frameworks for the study of race and ethnicity in P-20 systems. Following UCEA’s theme, this workshop will be purposeful in generating action related to the exploration of innovative research frameworks bringing to the fore the value of educational research developed by scholars of color.

    A Global Perspective of Social Justice: A New Lens for Analysis

    Rachel McNae, University of Waikato; Charles Slater, California State University, Long Beach Fernando Briceno, The European School Izhar Oplatka, Tel Aviv University; Stephanie Ogden, Knox County Schools; Khalid Husny Arar, The Centre for Academic Studies

    The International School Leaders Development Network social justice research builds on initial data collection to present three phase data analysis. This includes the macro, meso, and micro frame of the international context in which the research is placed; the positionality lens of the researcher through which the data are analyzed; and an outcomes frame, which places leaders’ weighting of the sources of social justice successes and challenges faced in the global context.

    Staying or Leaving? An Examination of Career Trajectories of Beginning Teachers

    Ahmet Latifoglu, The University of Melbourne

    This research compares experiences of beginning teachers (BTs) in their employment pathways of permanent, fixed-term contract and casual relief work in Australian secondary schools. This study adopts a labour market and school process perspective in determining which factors influence BTs’ career trajectories. From the interviews with 41 BTs in 10 metropolitan and provincial public schools, permanent beginning teachers enjoyed better working conditions and collegiality with enhanced teaching support compared to fixed-term contract and casual counterparts.

    Teaching Experience and Building Level on Combined Effect of Professional Commitment and Professional Relations and Interactions

    John K. Rugutt, Illinois State University; Caroline C. Chemosit, University of Kabianga, Kenya; Guy Banicki, Illinois State University. Chair: Anika Anthony, The Ohio State University

    Data from 1,345 K-12 teachers were used to examine relationships between teachers’ years of experience and building level on the combined effect of professional commitment and professional relations and interactions while controlling for collegial teaching and learning. The MANOVA results indicate no significant interaction effect. Teaching experience main effect was significant.

    Film Festival

    “The Brickfields Schools” – University of Manitoba, Canada

    Chairs: Jennifer Friend, University of Missouri-Kansas City Julia N. Ballenger, Texas A&M University

    UCEA Taskforce on Distance Learning

    Ron Wideman, Nipissing University; Teresa Northern Miller, Kansas State University April L. Peters-Hawkins, University of Georgia; Nancy Ann Staub, University of Toledo; Miles Bryant, University of Nebraska-Lincoln William Kyle Ingle, University of Louisville Michael Owens, Wayne State University. Chair: John Beuhring Nash, University of Kentucky

    This session focuses on the development of a UCEA taskforce focused on distance and digital education. UCEA will be extending its research and development efforts beyond the brick and mortar classroom in an effort to understand effective distance and digital teaching practices and tools, particularly those tools and practices that are meant to support the learning and development of educational leaders. All interested parties are welcome to attend and participate in this effort.

    Education Policy Fireside Chat with Darleen Opfe

    Darleen Opfer, University of Cambridge. Amy Reynolds, University of Virginia Isaiah Clarence McGee, University of Iowa

    Darleen Opfer, Director of RAND Education and Distinguished Chair in Education Policy, offered a fireside chat. This special session offers graduate students and other interested parties an opportunity to engage in discussion with Dr. Opfer about her work regarding the role of educational policy in achieving equitable outcomes for historically disadvantaged students.

    Performative Inquiry as an Approach to Leadership Education

    Michelle Nilson, Simon Fraser University; Lynn Fels, Simon Fraser University. Chair: Sylvia Mendez-Morse, Texas Tech University

    Leadership education requires fostering students’ abilities to contribute to society and enrich working relationships with others. It also requires that they have opportunities to develop and practice leadership and collaborative group skills. Evidence suggests that arts-based leadership programs have significant positive impact on leadership effectiveness (Romanowska et al., 2011), but these findings have had limited impact on the pedagogy in universities. This paper reports on the use of performative inquiry in an educational leadership program.

    Principals’ Work with ICT: A Doubled-Edged Sword

    Cameron Hauseman, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto; Katina Pollock, University of Western Ontario; Patricia Briscoe, Western University; Michael Mindzak, Western University. Chair: Marytza Gawlik, Florida State University

    The ways in which principals interact with information and communications technology (ICT) and the impact of the digital revolution on their work have yet to receive much academic consideration. We use data gathered from interviews with 70 different school principals to explore the nature of principals’ work and interactions with ICT. We also document how principals use ICT in their work and determine the motives influencing their use of ICT.

    Emotion Suppression among School Principals

    Izhar Oplatka, Tel Aviv University

    Emotion regulation refers to the processes by which individuals influence which emotions they have, when they have them, and how they experience and express these emotions. It includes inhibiting emotional expressions that are considered to be inappropriate in a certain social arena. Unfortunately, our knowledge about emotion suppression among school principals is very limited. This study aimed to trace the ways Israeli principals suppress the expression of particular emotions during their work life.

    Weaving Research and Policy Making for Inclusion and Human Rights in Global Education: A Joint UCEA-ASHE Session

    Luis Fernando Pérez, Ford Foundation South America; Pilar Mendoza, University of Missouri-Columbia Betty Merchant, University of Texas at San Antonio; Elliot H. Weinbaum, William Penn Foundation

    With a focus on social justice, inclusion, and human rights from a global perspective, this UCEA-ASHE joint Presidential Session will address the purposes of grant making and the lessons learned in successful partnerships with scholars applying research to critical international education issues.

    School Management: Principals’ Leadership and Educational Results in National Assessments in Brazil

    Cynthia Paes de Carvalho, PUC-Rio de Janeiro; Ana Cristina Prado Oliveira, PUC-Rio de Janeiro

    This study looks at the influence of principal leadership of the school faculty with respect to the educational attainment of students. Based on data from the contextual questionnaires used in the 2007, 2009, and 2011 editions of the nationwide achievement tests, the analysis shows statistically significant effects of principals’ leadership, teachers’ working conditions, and principals’ selections processes on 5th-year math results in the universe of elementary schools studied.

    The Importance of the Principal’s Role in High Need Schools: An International Perspective

    Kristine Kiefer Hipp, Cardinal Stritch University; Betty Alford, Stephen F. Austin State University Jami Royal Berry, Georgia State University; Shuangye Chen, The Chinese University of Hong Kong David Gurr, University of Melbourne; Elizabeth T. Murakami, Texas A&M University-San Antonio; Nathern Okilwa, University of Texas at San Antonio; Sailesh Sharma, University of Malaya; Monika Törnsén, Center for Principal Development, Umeå University.

    The International Leadership Development Network consists of researchers from UCEA– BELMAS conducting empirical research on high-needs school leadership across more than 20 countries. The purpose of this international community building session explores the preliminary findings from several high-needs schools across the globe (Australia, England, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Nepal, Sweden, and the United States). Findings were gleaned from interviews with principals, school leaders, and teachers.

    2014 International Summit

    Jan Heystek, Northwest University South Africa; Elson Szeto, Hong Kong Institute of Education; Annie Cheng, Hong Kong Institute of Education; David Gurr, University of Melbourne; Lawrie Drysdale, University of Melbourne; Elizabeth T. Murakami, Texas A&M University-San Antonio; Stephen L. Jacobson, University at Buffalo; Candido Gomes, Brasília Catholic University; Magali de Fátima Machado, Catholic University of Brasilia; Paul Miller, Brunel University; Helene Arlestig, University of Umea; Cristobal Rodriguez, New Mexico State University; Cynthia Paes de Carvalho, PUC-Rio de Janeiro; Ana Cristina Prado Oliveira, PUC-Rio de Janeiro; Allan Walker, Hong Kong Institute of Education. Chairs: Stephen L. Jacobson, University at Buffalo; Petros Pashiardis, Open University of Cyprus; Olof Johansson, Umeå University; R.C. Saravanabhavan, Howard University; Alexandre Ventura, University of Aveiro; Georgia Pashiardis, Ministry of Education of Cyprus; Bruce Barnett, University of Texas at San Antonio

    The International Summit is a half-day event featuring the work of educational leadership scholars from across the globe. Participants will have an opportunity to engage in generative conversations about the state of international comparative research and knowledge generation and the development of collaborative projects. The summit is comprised of two sessions with international perspectives designed to generate conversation about successful practice and preparation: a roundtable discussion and a social justice panel.